The good news: Many companies these days are using cybersecurity controls and security training for their employees. The bad news: A lot of these businesses are putting in the place the bare minimum in order to meet compliance requirements. The truth is, however, the you can be compliant but not secure. Remember the big Target breach in 2013? Hackers were able to take the debit and credit card information of millions are shoppers by accessing Target point-of-sale systems. The irony is that, just months before the attack, Target was certified PCI compliant. In the words of then-CEO Gregg Steinhafel, “Target was certified as meeting the standard for the payment card industry in September 2013. Nonetheless, we suffered a data breach.” Simply put: Target was compliant but not secure.

Creating a Culture

If your security awareness program is a “check the box” compliance program, you can bet your employees are going through the same motions as you are. How has that improved your security posture? It hasn’t.  Instead, creating a strong security program is first and foremost about creating a culture around security. And this has to start at the top, with your executive officers and your board. If business leaders set a security-focused tone, then employees will likely follow suit.

The reason a business can be compliant and not secure is because cybersecurity isn’t a one and done deal. Compliance is a state, cybersecurity is an ongoing process that involves the entire organization — from the boardroom to the cubicle. Verizon Data Breach Investigation Report shows that the human factor is the largest factor leading to breaches today. If that’s the case, perhaps instead of checking off the boxes and before investing in that new machine learning intrusion detection gizmo, consider focusing on human learning, engagement and the behaviors that can drive a mindful security culture.

Share This