Last week we wrote about the significant cost of business email compromise (BEC) scams compared to other, more-publicized cyber attacks. Now, the cybersecurity firm Agari has published a report showing a new BEC threat emerging — one that is more sophisticated and more costly than what we have seen in the past.

Business email compromise threats are a form of social engineering scams that have been around for a long time. “Nigerian prince scams,” for example, are what people often think of when they think of these types of attacks. However, as technology and modes of communication have gotten more sophisticated, so too have the scammers. Agari’s new report details the firm’s research on a new gang of BEC scammers based in Russia that call themselves “Cosmic Lynx.”

Unlike most BEC scams that tend to target smaller, more vulnerable organizations, the group behind Cosmic Lynx tends to go after gigantic corporations — most of which are Fortune 500 or Global 2000 companies. While larger organizations are more likely to have more sophisticated cybersecurity protocols in place, that doesn’t mean they can’t be tricked, and the payout for successful scams is significantly larger. The average amount requested through BEC is typically $55,000. Cosmic Lynx, on the other hand, requests $1.27 million on average.

How Does it Work?

While the basic’s of Cosmic Lynx’s BEC attacks are pretty standard, the group uses more advanced technology and social engineering tactics to make their scams more successful.

Typically, Cosmic Lynx uses a “dual impersonation scheme” that mimics indidvuals both within and outside of the target of the scams.  Moreover, by manipulating standard email authentication settings and registering domains that imitate common secure email domains (such as secure-mail-gateway[.]cc), the group is able to convincingly spoof their email address and display name to look almost identical to a employees within the targeted business. Acting as the CEO, the group will typically send an email to a Vice President or Managing Director notifying them of a new acquisition and referring the employee to an external legal team to finalize the deal and transfer funds.

Cosmic Lynx will then impersonate the identity of a real lawyer and send the employee an email explaining they are helping to facilitate the payment. Of course, organization receiving the funds is actually a mule account — typically Hong Kong-based — controlled by Cosmic Lynx.

 

sample spoofed email

Source: Agari

 

For now, Cosmic Lynx seems to be the only group carrying this new BEC threat, however it is very likely other groups, seeing the amount Cosmic Lynx is raking in, will begin to follow suit. Simply put, the level of sophistication involved in these scams will require businesses to have more sophisticated protections in place to prevent this new threat. While more advanced email filters may help to detect spoofed email addresses, the most effective method to prevent BEC scams is to have strong policies in place to verify payment requests before releasing funds.

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