Over the past few years, ransomware has become a more and more common form of cyber attack. In part, this is because hackers have started to sell pre-made packages that anyone can buy on the dark web and run without a lot of technical know-how. While this form of ransomware allows malicious code to spread automatically, it’s not always the most sophisticated form of attack. This may be why human-operated ransomware has become more popular over the past few months. Unlike pre-coded ransomware that blindly crawls through infected networks, human-operated ransomware attacks tend to play more of the long game. Once attackers gain access to a victim’s system, they take their time to gather as much intel as possible about their target, often waiting months before launching their attack. This helps them gain access to other areas within the network and ultimately make it extremely difficult for the victim to put a stop to the attack once it starts.

The key to combatting these more sophisticated attacks, then, is to stop them from accessing your systems in the first place. Often, ransomware attacks gain access by taking the path of least resistance, such as unpatched applications. This has been an especially big problem for the healthcare industry recently. As hospitals continue to be overwhelmed by COVID-19, they have not had the time and resources to safeguard security systems and update applications quickly.

For example, recently human-operated ransomware attackers are using out of date virtual private networks (VPNs) to gain access. In fact, Microsoft identified “several dozens of hospitals” that were vulnerable to attack because of outdated VPN applications. To help combat this issue, Microsoft has developed a new alert system to notify hospitals that have unpatched applications and other vulnerabilities.

With ransomware attackers playing the long game, it’s vitally important to ensure your systems and applications are patched and that you fix any known vulnerabilities. In addition, any potential compromise to your system, however small, should be investigated and dealt with as soon as possible. Otherwise, hackers can spend months moving throughout your networks undetected and make it near impossible to remove once they launch their attack.

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