GDPR Report Shows Success with Room for Improvement

GDPR Report Shows Success with Room for Improvement

The EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), one of the most comprehensive privacy laws in the world, celebrated its two-year anniversary last month. The regulation establishes a range of privacy and data protection rights to EU citizens, such as widened conditions for consent and the right to request companies delete user data, and requires organizations to implement technical safeguards. Along with the regulation comes some pretty hefty fines. Google, for example, received a 50 million euro fine for failing to properly state how they use consumer data. The law also requires that the GDPR commission release a report evaluating the regulation after the first two years, then every four years going forward. In compliance with the law, the commission released their report this month, broadly finding the regulation a success, but also highlighting certain areas for improvement.

Strengths

According to the GDPR report, one of the regulation’s main successes is the increased awareness of the privacy rights among EU citizens, and that they are empowered to exercise those rights. The report found that 69% of the EU population above 16 has heard of the GPDR and 71% know about their country’s nation data protection agency. One issue however, is that this awareness has not fully translated into the use of these rights. The right to data portability, for example, which allows users to obtain and transfer their data, shows potential to “put individuals at the centre of the data economy,” but, according to the report, is still underutilized.

One other area of success is the flexibility of the regulation in its ability to apply to principles of the law to emerging technologies. This has been especially important recently, with the rise of the COVID-19 pandemic and the numerous tracing apps created. The report found that the GDPR has been successful in providing a framework that allows for innovation while ensuring that these new technologies are created with privacy in mind.

Areas of Improvement

Perhaps the biggest area of concern that the report highlights, is the uneven enforcement of the GDPR among EU states. All EU members states except Slovenia have adopted the law. However, the report notes that the law has not been applied consistently across the board. For example, the GDPR allows individual member states to set the age of consent for data processing, but this has created uncertainty for children and parents and made it more difficult for companies that conduct business across borders. The commission has recommended a creating codes of conduct to apply across all member states in order to allow for more consistency between states.

The GDPR report also found that there is some inconsistency when it comes to enforcing the regulations. Overall, the report found that the various data protection agencies were properly using their strengthened enforcement capabilities, but worried that resources have not been evenly divided among the agencies. While some countries that are seen as tech hubs require additional resources, the commission found that the overall budget allocation was too inconsistent.

 

Taking a step back, the GDPR report largely shows that the new regulation has had a positive impact on the views towards privacy, and has empowered individuals to take control of their information. The law, however, is still relatively new, and will continue to require tweaks to better serve consumers. Privacy regulations continue to be a work in progress, but are at least headed in the right direction.

5 Tips To Protect Against Ransomware

5 Tips To Protect Against Ransomware

When you think about different types of cyber attacks, ransomware might not be the first thing to come to your mind. It’s the sort of thing you might expect to see in a movie, but not in real life. The truth is, however, that ransomware is an increasingly common form of cyber attack. Government agencies, for example, are now a prime target for ransomware. However, it’s not just governments that should be worrying. According to one report, ransomware attacks against businesses rose by a whooping 263% in 2019. Business everywhere should therefore ensure they take precautions to prevent a ransomware attack and also have a plan in place if one does happen. To help, here is a list of 5 ransomware tips that all businesses should consider.

Ransomware Tip #1: Back It Up

Perhaps the most crucial way to protect yourself against ransomware is to have a robust and regular backup system in place. Any data that is sensitive or essential to business operations should be backed up on a regular basis. However, you have to be smart about it. Make sure your backups are stored offline or somewhere separate from your other networks. If a hacker gains access to your systems, you want to ensure they won’t be able to reach your backups. You should also regularly test your backups to ensure there is no corruption in the data. That way, if an attack occurs and they encrypt your data, you can be sure you have a backup to avoid paying the ransom.

Ransomware Tip #2: Use Security Awareness Training

Ransomware attackers often gain access to systems by first conducting phishing attacks or other forms of social engineering exploits. The key to the attackers success are employees who are not sufficiently trained in detecting emails that contain malicious links. This is just one of the many reasons more businesses should invest in security awareness training programs. For many forms of cyber attacks, your employees are your first line of defense, so making sure they have the tools needed to spot phishing attacks is a must.

Ransomware Tip #3: Stay Up to Date

Operating systems and software are constantly being updated to patch any known security vulnerabilities, but it can be easy to miss an update or put it off for another day. The problem is that attackers are constantly looking for these vulnerabilities and will prey on anyone who hasn’t updated their systems. Updating software, operating systems, and applications should therefore be a priority. In many cases, you are able to set up your systems to update automatically when a new patch is released.

Ransomware Tip #4: Segment and Limit Access

If an attacker gets into your system, you want to ensure they can’t access everything. It’s therefore important to segment your networks. This essentially just means keeping different elements of your network separate from each other so you can control how information flows from one to the others. This also involves implementing access controls so that users on your network are only able to access what they need for their job. These controls should be regularly evaluated. That way, if an attacker steals one of your user’s credentials, they won’t be able to access your entire network.

Ransomware Tip #5: Plan Your Response

Lastly, when it comes to ransomware, it’s important to not just try and prevent an attack, but also have have a plan in place in case one actually happens. Ransomware response should be included in every organization’s overall incident response plan, and you should have a team dedicated to carrying out the plan if an attack happens. Every organization’s response to a ransomware attack will be different, so response teams should sit down with members of the organization at various levels to ensure everyone is on the same page.

Where There’s No Will, There’s a Way!

Where There’s No Will, There’s a Way!

Maybe the biggest misconception about forming new habits is that the biggest factor for success is the motivation to change. We often imagine that as long as we want to make a change in our lives, we have the power to do it. In fact, motivation is actually the least reliable element making behavior changes. The hard truth is that simply wanting to make a change is far from enough.

The reason? Motivation isn’t a static thing, it comes and goes in waves. It’s therefore tough to keep our motivation high enough to lead to lasting behavior change. Take the response to the COVID-19 pandemic, for example. When it appeared in the U.S, we were highly motivated to socially distance. As time went on, however, more and more people started to take risks and go out more. The reason isn’t because the dangers were any less present, but because our motivation to stay inside started to wane. The point is, if the sole component to any behavior change is motivation, once that motivation starts to diminish, so will the new habit.

Of course, we have to at some level want to make a change, but we also have to realize that it’s simply not enough. Instead, we need to rely more on starting with changes that requires the least amount of motivate necessary for it to occur. This is the idea behind BJ Fogg’s Tiny Habits that we wrote about last week. If you want to start reading more, it might be tempting to try reading a chapter or two every day. But more often than not, you’re not going to be motivated to keep that up for long. Instead, if your goal is just to read one paragraph of a day a couple times a day, you’re far more likely to keep up the new habit. Then, over time, you’ll find you need less motivation to read more and more, until you don’t even think about it any more.

This can be a hard pill to swallow. We like to believe that we can do anything we set our minds to, and it’s a little disheartening to think we don’t have as much control over our motivation as we might prefer. When looked at from a different angle, however, understanding this fact allows us to focus on what we can control: setting achievable goals and rewarding ourselves when we met them. Focusing on that rather than our inability to keep our motivation high will lead to more successful behavior change.

To Teach Someone to Phish…

To Teach Someone to Phish…

Given that phishing attacks are now the #1 cause of successful data breaches, it’s no surprise that many individuals and organizations are looking for tools to help them get better at spotting phish. The problem, however, is that most of the available education tools reply on “passive” training material: infographics, videos, and sample phish. While this educational tools might teach you a few facts and figures, they don’t always lead to a long term change in how users respond to phish. Instead, educators should be looking for new tools and methods that change the very way we look at our emails. You know the phrase “Give someone a fish, feed him for a day. Teach someone to fish, feed him for a lifetime”? Well, the same is true for phish too.

The idea is simple: Instead of just looking at examples of phish, by engaging in the process of creating a phish you will internalize the tactics and tricks scammers in real life and will be better able to spot them.

There is  actually a method that has been proven to work in similar settings, such as recognizing propaganda and misinformation. It’s called inoculation theory. The idea is similar to how vaccines work: by exposing people to small doses of something more dangerous, and by actively engaging them in the process, they can better defend themselves against the real thing in the future. Cambridge University used this theory to create an online game that asks users to create their own fake news.

In a similar way, teaching someone how to make phish creates an engaging way for users to understand how actual phishers think and what tactics they use to trick people. We believe this form of training has the potential to be far more successful in help users create long lasting change and help them stay safer online.

Disinformation: The Appearance of Truth

Disinformation: The Appearance of Truth

In 1989 the U.S. Postal Service issued new stamps that featured four different kinds of dinosaurs. While the stamps look innocent enough, their release was the source of controversy among paleontologists, and even serves as an example of how misinformation works by making something false appear to be true.

The controversy revolves around the inclusion of the brontosaurus, which, according to scientists at that time, never existed. In 1874, paleontologist O.C. Marsh discovered the bones of what he thought was a new species of dinosaur. He called it the brontosaurus. However, as more scientists discovered similar fossils, they realized that what Marsh had found was in fact a species previous identified as an apatosaurus, which, ironically, is Greek for “deceptive lizard.” Paleontologists were therefore rightly upset to see the brontosaurus included on a stamp with real dinosaurs.

Over 30 year later, however, these stamps may have something to teach us about how disinformation works today. They show how disinformation is not simply about falsehoods — it’s about how those falsehoods are presented so as to seem true.

The stamps help illustrate this in three ways:

1) Authority

One of the ways something can appear to be true is when the information comes from a figure of authority. Because the stamps were officially released by the U.S. government, it gives the information contained on them the appearance of truth. Of course, no one would think the USPS is an authority on dinosaurs, and yet the very position of authority the postal service occupies seems to serve as a guarantee of the truth of what is presented. The appearance of authority, however wrongly placed it is, is often enough for us to believe something to be true.

This is a tactic used by scammers all the time. It’s the reason why you’ve probably gotten a lot of robocalls claiming to be the IRS. Phishing emails also use this tactic by spoofing the ‘from’ field and using logos of businesses and government agencies. We too often assume that, just because information appears to be coming from an authority, it must be true.

2) Truths and a Lie

Another way something false can appears true is by placing what is fake among things that are actually true. The fact that the other stamps in the collection — the tyrannosaurus, the stegosaurus, and the pteranodon — are real gives the brontosaurus the appearance of truth. By placing one piece of false information alongside recognizably true information, that piece of false information starts to look more and more like a truth.

Fake news on social media uses this tactic all the time. Phishing attacks also take advantage of this by replicating certain aspects of legitimate emails. This might include mentioning information in the news, such as COVID-19, or even including things like an unsubscribe link at the end of the email. This tactic works by using legitimate information and elements in an email to cover up what is fake.

3) Anchoring

The US Postal Service did not invent the brontosaurus:  in fact, the American Museum of Natural History named a skeleton brontosaurus in 1905.  Once a claim is stated as truth, it becomes very hard to dislodge.  This was actually the reasoning the US Postal Service used when they were challenged: “Although now recognized by the scientific community as Apatosaurus, the name Brontosaurus was used for the stamp because it is more familiar to the general population.”  Anchoring is a key aspect of disinformation, especially with regards to persistency.

Beyond Appearances

Overall, what the brontosaurus stamp shows us is that our ability to discern the true from the false largely depends on how information is presented to us. Scammers and phishers have understood this for a long time. The first step in critically engaging with information online is therefore to recognize that just because something appears true does not, in fact, make it true. Given the continued rise of disinformation, this is a lesson that is more important now than ever. In fact, it is unlikely disinformation will ever become extinct.

Tiny Habits, Big Changes

Tiny Habits, Big Changes

When you want to form a new habit or learn something new, you may think the best way to start is to dedicate as much time and energy as you can to it. If you want a learn new language, for example, you may think that spending a couple of hours every day doing vocab drills will help you learn faster. Well, according to behavioral scientist BJ Fogg, you might be taking the wrong approach. Instead, it’s better to focus on what Fogg calls tiny habits: small, easy to accomplish actions that keep you engaged without overwhelming you.

Sure, if you study Spanish for three hours a day you may learn at a fast rate. The problem, however, is that too often we try to do too much too soon. By setting unrealistic goals or expecting too much from ourselves, new habits can be hard to maintain. Instead, if you only spend five minutes a day, chances are you will be able to sustain and grow the habit over a longer period of time and have a better chance of retaining what you’ve learned.

The Keys To Success

According to Fogg, in order to create lasting behavior change, three elements come together at the same moment need to come together:

  1. Motivation: You have to want to make a change.
  2. Ability: The new habit has to be achievable.
  3. Prompt: There needs to be some notification or reminder that tells you its time to do the behavior.

Creating and sustaining new habits requires all three of these elements to be successful — with any element missing, your new behavior won’t occur. For example, if you want go for a 5 mile run, you’re going to need a lot of motivation to do it. But if you set smaller, easy to achieve goals — like running for 5 minutes — you only need a little motivation to do the new behavior.

The other key factor is to help yourself feel successful. Spending 2 minutes reviewing Spanish tenses may not feel like a big accomplishment, but by celebrating every little win you will reinforce your motivation to continue.

The Future of Cyber Awareness

Tiny habits can not only help people learn a new language or start flossing, it can also play an important role in forming safer, more conscious online practices. Our cyber awareness training program, The PhishMarket™, is designed with these exact principles in mind. The program combines two elements, both based on Fogg’s model:

Phish Simulations: Using phish simulations help expose people to different forms of phish attacks, and motivates them to be more alert when looking at their inbox. While most programs scold or punish users who fall for a phish, The PhishMarket™ instead uses positive reinforcement to encourage users to keep going.

Micro-Lessons: Unlike most training programs that just send you informative videos and infographics, The PhishMarket™ exclusively uses short, interactive lessons that engage users and encourage them to participate and discuss what they’ve learned. By keeping the lessons short, users only need to dedicate a few minutes a day and aren’t inundated with a barrage of information all at once.

Creating smart and safe online habits is vital to our world today. But traditional training techniques are too often boring, inconsistent, and end up feeling like a chore. Instead, we believe the best way to help people make meaningful changes in their online behavior is to focus on the small things. By leveraging Fogg’s tiny habits model, The PhishMarket™ has successfully helped users feel more confident in their ability to spot phish and disinformation.

Cyber Awareness in Remote Environments: How do you keep people engaged?

Cyber Awareness in Remote Environments: How do you keep people engaged?

The current crisis has forced all of us to make changes that we otherwise wouldn’t have made. The upside, however, is that some of these changes may end up benefiting us well beyond the pandemic. One area that desperately needs this change is our view of cyber awareness — whether in remote environments or at the office. One report found that 91% of IT leaders simply trusted their employees to maintain safe security practices while working at home. This trust, it turns out, is misplaced, with 48% of employees saying that they are less likely to follow security practices at home. The bottom line is, if organizations want their employees to take cyber awareness in remote environments more seriously, they need to find a new way to help their employees create lasting behavior change.

Working from home creates unique challenges for their employees. They’re distracted, they’re doing their work on their personal devices, and they don’t have co-workers and managers there to motivate them. To build better cyber awareness while working from home, organizations should therefore focus on creating “micro-moments.” These micro-moments are small opportunities that contain four key elements:

  1. Short
  2. Frequent and consistent
  3. Engaging
  4. Involve positive reinforcement

By combing these elements, micro-moments sensitize employees to thinking about cyber awareness in their daily work, motivate them to continue learning, and keep them from thinking about cyber awareness as a burden or something that takes away their ability to get work done.

We know this works because it is the very foundation of Designed Privacy’s cyber awareness program, The PhishMarket™. The program combines phish simulations, daily micro-lessons, and detailed reporting to create behavior change that employee want to maintain. A study of The PhishMarket™ conducted by Stanford’s Peace Innovation Lab found that our program resulted in a 30% reduction in overall phish susceptibility in just four weeks, and 70% of participants said they would do the program again.

By incorporating a new a new type of cyber awareness training that focuses on creating micro-moments, organizations can help their employees create lasting behavior change, and the trust IT leaders have in their employees won’t be as misplaced as before.

Hacked But Not Yet Attacked: What You Should Do

Hacked But Not Yet Attacked: What You Should Do

A hacker got into your system, but you spot the problem before the hacker has a chance to carry out an attack. Best case scenario, right? Well, it all depends on what you do next. The government of Florence, Alabama found themselves in this exact situation, but their response is now costing them nearly $300,000. Here’s what happened:

In late May, cybersecurity report Brian Krebs received a tip that hackers known for ransomware attacked gained access to Florence’s IT system. Krebs made numerous attempts to contact city officials before finally receiving a voicemail thanking him for the tip and telling him that the city took care of the issue. However, on June 5th the city announced that a ransomware attack shut down the city’s email system. The city plans on paying the hackers the nearly $300,000 ransom to restore their system.

So, what went wrong? According to city officials, when the attack hit, the IT department was in the middle of securing approval for funds to investigate and stop the attack. Local governments are often slow to act, to be sure, but officials knew about the hacker 10 days before the attack and they still weren’t prepared. The bottom line is, given the rise in ransomware attacks on public institutions, Florence officials needed to have a detailed plan in place before an attack took place. Instead, they scrambled. And, to add insult to injury, hackers accessed to the city’s systems by stealing the Florence IT manager’s credentials through a phishing attack.

How to Beat the Hackers

So, what should you do if you know you’ve been hacked but haven’t yet been attacked? Here are just a few steps you can take:

1. Have a Plan in Place

One of the main reasons Florence was slow to act is because they waited until after the hack to figure out a game plan. Instead, the city needed to have a detailed incident response plan in place. This involves first identifying what types of attacks you are most vulnerable to. Then, you need to create a detailed step-by-step response for each type of attack, and create a team of employees responsible for carrying out each of the steps. You also need to ensure you have contingency funds readily availble to carry out the plan quickly. Finally, it is important to simulate each type of attack so that the team can practice carrying out their response. Overall, the goal of an incident response plan is to deal with potential attacks as quickly and efficiently as possible.

2. Shut Down and Isolate Infected Systems

In order to keep the hackers from accessing other systems, it is important to shut down and isolate infected systems and any devices connected to it. Remove the system from your network. Disconnect the system’s wireless and bluetooth capabilities. Any devices previously connected to the infected systems should be shut down and removed from the network. Along with keeping the hack from spreading, this also limits the hacker’s ability to encrypt or damage the infected systems.

3. Secure Your Backups

Having updated and secure backups are especially important for ransomware attacks. If a hacker encrypts your data, having a recent backup of that data could save you from having to pay the ransom. There are two important caveats, however. First, it’s important that you regular test your backups to ensure your data isn’t corrupted in the backup or restoration process. Second, keeping the copies of your backups secure and offline is essential. Otherwise, it is possible for hackers to gain access to your backups and encrypt of remove them from your systems.

4. When in Doubt, Rebuild

The hard truth is, the most reliable way to shut down a hack before an attack is to completely remove the infected systems and rebuild them from scratch. Of course, the time, resources, and personnel required to do this makes it a difficult pill to swallow for many organizations. However, it is the only way to guarantee that a hack is removed from your systems.

The Bottom Line

Spotting a hack before the attack can give you the leg up on the hackers. But, as the ransomware attack on Florence, Alabama makes clear, knowing that someone accessed into your systems is not enough. You need to have a game plan ready to go and carry it out as fast as possible. Using your time and resources to prepare for an attack now will give you piece of mind, and potentially reduce the cost of a hack later. 

Paris Calling…..Faut-il répondre?

Paris Calling…..Faut-il répondre?

This week, Canada announced that, along with Microsoft and the Alliance for Securing Democracy, they will be leading an initiative to counter election interference as outlined in the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace. The Paris Call is an international agreement outlining steps to establish universal norms for cybersecurity and privacy. The agreement has now been signed by over 550 entities, including 95 countries and hundreds of nonprofits, universities, and corporations. Nations such as Russia, China, and Israel did not sign the agreement, but one country’s absence is particularly notable—the U.S.

While the Paris Call is largely symbolic, with no legally-binding standards, it does outline 9 principles that the agreement commits to uphold and promote. Among these principles are the protection of individuals and infrastructure from cyber attack, the defense of intellectual property, and the defense of election from interference.

Non-Government Entities are Governing Cybersecurity Norms

Despite the U.S.’s absence from the agreement, many of the United States’ largest tech companies signed the agreement, such as IBM, Facebook, and Google. In addition, Microsoft says it worked especially close with the French government to write the Paris Call. The inclusion of private organizations in the agreement is a sign of the increasing importance of non-governmental entities in shaping and enforcing cybersecurity practices. The fact that Microsoft—and not the U.S.—is taking a lead on the agreement’s principle to counter election inference is a particularly strong example of how private companies are shaping the relationship between technology and democracy.

A Flawed Step, But a Step Nonetheless

Some organizations that signed the agreement, however, remain wary of private influence and how it might affect some of the principles of the Paris Call. Access Now, a non-profit dedicated to a free and open internet, raised concerns about how the agreement might give too much authority to private companies. One of the agreement’s principles, for example, encourages stakeholders to cooperate to address cyber criminality, which Access Now worries could be interpreted as a relaxing of judicial standards that would allow for an “informal exchange of data” between companies and government agencies. The non-profit also worries the principle concerning the protection of intellectual property could lead to a “heavy-handed approach,” by both private and public entities, “that could limit the flow of information online and risk freedom of expression and the right to privacy.”

On the opposite side, others have argued that the principles are more fluff than substance, fairy tales without specificity and accountability.

That being said, Paris Call is at the very least an acknowledgment that, similar to climate change, our global reliance on technology requires policy coordination on a global scale, involving not only nations, but the technology companies that are helping define our future, as well.  After all, it’s hard to imagine solving any global issue without a coordinated technology supporting us.  Paris Call may not be the right answer, but we probably should pick up and be part of the conversation.

Phish Scales: Weighing Your Risk

Phish Scales: Weighing Your Risk

With phishing campaigns now the #1 cause of successful breaches, it’s no wonder more and more businesses are investing in phish simulations and cybersecurity awareness programs. These programs are designed to strengthen the biggest vulnerability every business has and that can’t be fixed  through technological means: the human factor. One common misconception that may employers have, however, is that these programs should result in a systematic reduction of phish clicks over time. After all, what is the point of investing in phish simulations if your employees aren’t clicking on less phish? Well, a recent report from The National Institute of Standards and Technology actually makes the opposite argument. Phish come in all shapes and sizes; some are easy to catch while others are far more cunning. So, if your awareness program only focuses on phish that are easy to spot or are contextually irrelevant to the business, then a low phish click rate could lead to a false sense of of security, leaving employee’s unprepared for more crafty phishing campaigns. It’s therefore important that phish simulations present a range of difficulty, and that’s where the phish scale come in.

Weighing Your Phish

If phish simulations vary the difficulty of their phish, then employers should expect their phish click rates to vary as well. The problem is that this makes it hard to measure the effectiveness of the training. NIST therefore introduced the phish scale as a way to rate the difficulty of any given phish and weigh that difficulty when reporting the results of phish simulations. The scale focuses on two main factors:

#1 Cues

The first factor included in the phish scale is the number of “cues” contained in a phish. A cue is anything within the email that one can look for to determine if it is real of not. Cues include anything from technical indicators, such as suspicious attachments or an email address that is different from the sender display name, to the type of content the email uses, such as an overly urgent tone or spelling and grammar mistakes. The idea is that the less cues a phish contains, the more difficult it will be to spot.

#2 Premise Alignment

The second factor in the phish scale is also the one that has a stronger influence on the difficulty of a phish. Essentially, premise alignment has to do with how accurately the content of the email aligns with what an employee expects or is used to seeing in their inbox. If a phish containing a fake unpaid invoice is sent to an employee who does data entry, for example, that employee is more likely to spot it than someone in accounting. Alternatively, a phish targeting the education sector is not going to be very successful if it is sent to a marketing firm. In general, the more a phish fits the context of a business and the employee’s role, the harder it will be to detect.

Managing Risk and Preparing for the Future

The importance of the phish scale is more than just helping businesses understand why phish click rates will vary. Instead, understanding how the difficulty of a phish effects factors such as response times and report rates will deepen the reporting of phish simulations, and ultimately give organizations a more accurate view of their phish risk. In turn, this will also influence an organization’s broader security risk profile and strengthen their ability to respond to those risks.

The phish scale can also play an important role in the evolving landscape of social engineering attacks. As email filtering systems become more advanced, phishing attacks may lessen over time. But that will only lead to new forms of social engineering across different platforms. NIST therefore hopes that the work done with the phish scale can also help manage responses to these threats as they emerge.

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