COVID-Related Business ID Theft Rising Fast

COVID-Related Business ID Theft Rising Fast

Alongside all of the harm the COVID-19 pandemic has caused to our family, friends, and businesses, the unfortunate truth is that hackers and scammers are profiting off of the chaos. From data breaches of government sites, to hacks against the healthcare industry, to COVID-related phishing themes, consumers have reported over $98 million lost in COVID-19 scams since January. What is not included in that number, however, is the dramatic increase in COVID-related ID theft against businesses.

Business ID theft is not a new problem. Dun and Bradstreet, a data analytics company that handles credit checks for many businesses, reported a 100% increase in ID theft against businesses in 2019. This year, however, the problem has grown out of control, with a stunning 258% spike in business identity theft since the beginning of 2020. This is in large part directly related to the COVID-19 pandemic, because scammers will steal business information to illegally gain access to relief funds and loans.

According to reports, there are groups of cyber scammers that target small businesses for ID theft throughout the United States. The groups will start by looking up business records through the Secretary of State website, identity the officers and owners connect to the company, then find corresponding tax ID and social security numbers on the dark web. These groups will then forge official documents with this information and submit them to the Secretary of State with a mailing address that they control. Traditionally, they will use these documents to update profiles on credit monitoring sites, like Dun and Bradstreet, and apply for credit lines with companies like Staples, Home Depot and Office Depot. Now, however, these groups have switched their tactics and are carrying out business ID thefts for COVID-related federal assistance, such as unemployment payments or relief loans for small businesses.

As we’ve wrote about before, hackers and scammers will often take advantage if times of crisis, confusion, and uncertainty in order to make money or seed further chaos. Given the dramatic rise of business ID theft throughout the COVID pandemic, small businesses should take steps to protect themself against this threat. The most effective way to detect and prevent ID theft is to regularly monitor and update your business information. This includes keeping an eye on your financial records and credit lines to spot potential fraudulent activity, as well as checking your business records with the federal and state government. If you spot a any changes your records that you don’t recognize, it’s a likely sign someone is in the process of stealing your business’ identity.

It can be hard to regularly monitor your records and stay vigilant when you are trying to keep your business afloat throughout the pandemic, but this is exactly what scammers are hoping for. You don’t need to be checking your credit report every single day, but it is essential to keep as close an eye as possible on your records to ensure you and your business are protected from fraud.

1 in 5 Small Businesses Unprepared for Ransomware

1 in 5 Small Businesses Unprepared for Ransomware

In October, the FBI warned that ransomware attacks are becoming “more targeted, sophisticated, and costly.” Now, a new survey shows that small business are baring the brunt of these attacks, with 46% reporting that they have been targeted.

Ransomware is a form of cyber attack in which the attacker steals or encrypts the victim’s data and demands payment in order to regain access to that data. The new survey highlights two issues that small businesses in particular at a high risk for further attacks and even irreparable data loss.

1. No Data Protection in Place

Perhaps the most troubling trend the survey found is that 20% of small business do not have data protection systems in place. Using solutions such as data backup or disaster recover tools are essential for a variety of potential issues, but especially for ransomware. According to Russell P. Reeder, the CEO of the company behind survey, “every modern company depends on data and operational uptime for its very survival…Data protection and operational uptime have never been more important than during the unprecedented times we are currently facing.”

With a strong backup system that is tested regularly, small businesses faced with a ransomware attack are in better position to recover their data without succumbing to the demands of the attackers. Without proper data protection systems in place, however, businesses are left in the hands of the bad guy, with no other means to recover their data. And the truth is, the more small businesses that leave themselves unprotected, the more they will be targeted. Ransomware attackers are looking for easy money, and are therefore far more likely to target those who leave themselves the most vulnerable.

2. To Pay or Not to Pay

The survey also found that a whooping 73% of small businesses targeted by ransomware opted to pay the ransom in order to get their data back. One reason for this is that, if a business does not have proper data protection in place, the cost to restore data may end up being more costly than simply paying the bad guys. However, this solution is misguided on a number of fronts.

First of all, there is no guarantee that paying the ransom will result in regaining all or even any of the data stolen. The survey found that 17% of those who paid the ransom did not recover all of their data.  Secondly, paying the ransom is a short-term solution to a long-term problem. Paying the ransom signals to attackers that they can squeeze money out of that business in the future. Reporting by ProPublica also found ransomware payments were substantially lower than they are now, and that the number of businesses willing to cough up the dough has led to an increase in the price of the ransom.

Prevent and Defend

In order to defend against ransomware attacks, small businesses should first and foremost ensure they have strong data protection solutions in place. However, this is only one piece of the puzzle. Taking measures such as awareness training can help prevent these attacks in the first place. Ransomware attackers often gain access to systems through malware installed via phishing campaigns. If you and your staff are properly trained to spot deceptive practices, you already have a leg up on the bad guys. Attackers also hope that their victims will panic and make rash decisions. There is no question that falling victim to ransomware is scary stuff, but taking a few breaths, reviewing your options, and responding rationally might help keep your money and data in your hands and prevent further attacks from taking place in the future.