Your Cybersecurity Controls Might Be Hurting More Than Helping

Your Cybersecurity Controls Might Be Hurting More Than Helping

In many cases, our employees are our first line of defense against cyber-attack. However, for employees to start developing habits that are in line with cybersecurity practices, it’s essential business leaders need to understand effective strategies for getting these habits to stick. One of the main tenants of behavioral science is that the new habit you want to see needs to be easy to accomplish.

Ideally, you and your IT team can put in place effective cybersecurity controls that make developing secure habits easier for your employees. But what happens when these security features make it more difficult for users to perform the positive and secure behaviors you want to see?

This is the topic of new research on cybersecurity risk management and behavior design. In “Refining the Blunt Instruments of Cybersecurity: A Framework to Coordinate Prevention and Preservation of Behaviors,” researchers Simon Parkin and Yi Ting Chua highlight the importance of making sure that cybersecurity controls that limit malicious or negative behaviors don’t also restrict the positive behaviors your employees are trying to accomplish. For example, it’s common practice for companies to require their employees to change their passwords every few months. However, not only does this put the burden on employees for keeping their accounts secure, research has shown that users who are required to create new passwords frequently tend to use less and less secure passwords over time. While you may think having employees change their passwords will help keep your network more secure, doing so might actually have the opposite effect.

To ensure security controls aren’t restricting users from engaging in positive behaviors, Parkin and Chua emphasize the need to more precisely target malicious behaviors. To do so, they outline three steps business leaders and IT teams should take to more precisely define their cybersecurity controls.

1. Create a system to identify positive behaviors

To ensure you are preserving the positive behaviors your employees are doing, you first have to figure out how to track those behaviors. Unfortunately, it can be a lot easier to identify behaviors you don’t want to see, than those you do want to see. An employee clicking a malicious link in an email address, for example, can be identified. But, how do you identify when an employee doesn’t click the link in a phishing email? One solution is to give users access to a phish reporting button direct within their email client.

Whatever you decide, it’s essential to both identify the positive behaviors you want to see and create a system to track when those behaviors are used by employees.

2. Find linkages between negative and positive behaviors

Now that you can track both positive and negative behaviors, the next step is to look at your security controls and identify possible linkages between the negative behavior the control is defined to restrict and positive behaviors you want employees to engage in. If a control affects both positive and negative behaviors, there is a linkage the control is creating — a linkage you want to break.

3. Better define controls to prevent negative behaviors and promote positive behaviors.

Once you’ve identified linkages between positive and negative behaviors, the next step is to find ways to ensure your controls are only affecting the negative behaviors. For example,  instead of requiring users to create new passwords every few months, system monitoring tools can be used to detect suspicious activity and block access to a user’s account without the user having to do anything.

 

At the end of the day, if the habits you want your employees to form aren’t easy to accomplish, it’s not going to happen. And it’s definitely not going to happen if your security controls are actively making things harder for your employees. It’s essential for you and your IT team to take the time to review your current controls and actively identify ways to maintain your security without affecting your employee’s ability to form secure habits at work.

Human Risk Caused the Colonial Pipeline Attack

Human Risk Caused the Colonial Pipeline Attack

Tools such as endpoint detection, anti-malware software, and firewalls play a vital role in protecting from the diversity of cyber threats businesses face today. However, for those tools to work, they need to be properly installed, configured, and updated by people. When considering the human factors of cybersecurity, we often think of social engineering scams. But equally as important is managing human errors. In fact, this form of human risk was exactly what led to the massive Colonial Pipeline ransomware attack earlier this year.

Human risk involves not just what we do, but also what we don’t do. This was the case with the colonial pipeline attack. In June, the CEO of Colonial Pipeline, Joseph Blount, told a Senate Committee that the attack was caused by unauthorized accessed to a virtual private network (VPN) the company had once used and that did not have multi-factor authentication (MFA). MFA is a tool that requires users to verify their login through a second means, such as a text message or email that contains a unique code. Because this VPN did not use MFA, that extra layer of security was missing and the hackers got in unnoticed. The real kicker, however, is that Colonial Pipeline was already using a new VPN with more security features. However, the legacy VPN was still installed on Colonial Pipeline’s systems. According to Blount, the VPN the hackers accessed “was not intended to be in use.” The ransomware attack was therefore a result of someone within Colonial Pipeline neglecting to take the old VPN off of the company’s servers.

Risk, no matter the form, is the result of habits and behaviors. In order to address these issues, we need to create healthy, sustainable habits that limit human risks. They say old habits die hard but creating sustained change is possible if these three elements come together:

1. Keep it simple

When trying to create new behaviors for your employees, it’s vital to break things down into small pieces. Asking questions like “What behaviors do I want to do that will mitigate risk” is a good place to start, but once you have a list, choose one behavior and focus on that. The reason is that people are more likely to do something consistently if it’s simple and easy to do. By focusing on one behavior at a time, your staff is far more likely to follow through than if you give them a whole list of changes you want them to make.

2. Use a prompt

The next part of the equation is creating a prompt that alerts your employee to do the behavior you are designing for. This prompt can take any number of forms, like a scheduled email, a slack notification, or a checklist. When we have a habit, we aren’t actively thinking about having to do it, so when you want to create a new habit prompts will break that automatic thinking and make room for them to incorporate the new behavior you want to see.

3. Provide positive feedback

Lastly, once the new behavior is accomplished, it’s important to follow up with some sort of positive feedback. This helps reinforce the importance of the behavior by helping your staff associate this new habit with a positive feeling, making it more likely they will follow through again in the future.

Using Colonial Pipeline as an example, applying these behavioral principles for their IT could have helped prevent the hackers from gaining access. First, someone in the leadership could have communicated to one member of IT and asked them to take an inventory of applications installed once a month and remove anything that is out of date or no longer in use. Then, a prompt such as a scheduled email could have been created to send to the employee on the first of every month. Finally, the employee could be sent a message thanking them for taking an inventory — they could even create a point or star system that helps employees tally the completed behaviors that Colonial was designing for.

Mitigating human risk is a central aspect of a business’s overall cybersecurity posture. And the key is to create new, healthy behaviors by putting in place a system that helps your employees form new habits in a way that’s simple and leaves them feeling successful.

 

Governing Ransomware Risk for Small Businesses

Governing Ransomware Risk for Small Businesses

By now, you’ve almost certainly heard about ransomware — a form of cyber-attack in which hackers encrypt systems, steal data then demand a ransom payment to end the attack. While ransomware has been around for a while now, attackers have started setting their sights on bigger and bigger targets, gaining international media attention in the process.

But the reason businesses should be paying attention to ransomware is not because big corporations are shelling out millions of dollars in ransom payments. Instead, when you look at the bigger picture, small businesses are the ones who will continue to bear the brunt of these attacks. According to the Secretary of Homeland Security Alejandro Mayorkas, there has been a 300% increase in ransomware attacks in the past year and 50-70% of those attacks were directed against small and medium sized businesses. And while a cyberattack is tough for any businesses to recover from, the threat ransomware poses to small businesses is existential, with 60% of small businesses failing within 6 months of a cyber-attack.

Because the threat is so big and the stakes are so high, governing ransomware risk needs to be a top priority for small businesses. And in order to protect your organization, there are two vital areas that need to be focused on: systems controls and organizational culture.

Systems Controls

1. Endpoint detection and response

Endpoint detection and response (EDR) is a type of security software that actively monitors endpoints like phones, laptops and other devices in order to identify any activity that could be malicious or threatening. Once a potential threat is identified, EDR will automatically respond by getting rid of or containing the threat and notifying your security or IT team. EDR is vital today in order to stay on top of potential threats and put a stop to them before they can cause any damage.

2. Hardening your RDP Ports

Remote Desktop protocol is a tool that allows someone to connect to a computer remotely. This can be useful, but more and more ransomware attackers are using RDP ports to gain access to victims’ systems. Organization that do not actively use RDP should therefore consider disabling the feature or limiting to users and devices that are not connected to public internet.

3. Back-ups

Having a back-up of your systems could allow you to regain access to your data without having to pay the ransom. However, it’s essential to have an effective back up strategy in order to ensure the attackers don’t steal your backups along with everything else. At minimum, at least one backup should be stored offsite. You should also utilize different credentials for each copy of your back-up. Finally, you should regularly test your back-ups to ensure you will be able to quickly and effectively get your systems online if an attack happens.

Multi-Factor Authentication

Lastly, using multi-factor authentication (MFA) is a simple yet powerful tool for stopping the bad guys from using stolen credentials. At minimum, any user accessing your network should be using MFA. In addition, all users with administrative privileges need to use MFA, whether they are accessing your network remotely or on premise.

Don’t Forget Culture

When it comes to governing ransomware risk, the best way to prevent attacks is to focus on creating a culture that incorporates cyber-secure behaviors into every day practices. However, the biggest issue many organizations face when creating a cybersecure culture is sustaining those behaviors overtime. In order to properly govern ransomware risk, behavior change requires 4 essential elements:

1. Consistent Communication

We get it, cybersecurity can be confusing. And as the threat landscape changes, so do our cybersecurity policies. That’s why it’s so important that business leadership consistently communicate with their employees about the behaviors you want to see.

2. Make it Easy

When thinking about the behaviors you want employees to adopt, it’s vital you make these behaviors as easy as possible to do. Everyone is being pulled in a million different directions at once, so if an employee has to take 10 minutes out of their day to figure out how to report a phish, they aren’t going to follow through. If, however, you provide a simple and easy-to-use process, you’re going to have a much easier time getting employees to adopt new behaviors.

3. Help People feel Successful

People want to feel like the work they are doing is making a difference. If they feel like what they are doing just doesn’t really matter all that much, there isn’t going to be much motivation to continue doing it. That’s why it’s so important to help people feel successful when they follow through on the behaviors you want to see. Providing positive feedback, for example, can go a long way towards creating behavior change. If your employees know their work is being recognized and feel it makes a difference, they will be much more likely to keep it up.

4.Walking the Walk

The above three elements for creating sustained behavior change have one thing in common: you. A leadership team can’t simply talk the talk. Change starts at the top and requires you and your leadership team take an active role ensuring these behaviors become a part of the organizational culture and value structure.

 

There’s no doubt that ransomware poses a big threat to small businesses, and the best thing you can do govern the risks of attack is focusing on creating a culture in which cybersecurity is valued and acted upon every single day.

Compromised Credentials and BEC: A Deadly Combo

Compromised Credentials and BEC: A Deadly Combo

Yesterday, I received an email from a business acquaintance that included an invoice.  I knew this person and his business but did not recall him every doing anything for me that would necessitate a payment.  I called him to about the email and he said that his account had been indeed hacked and those emails were not from him.  What occurred was an example of business email compromise (BEC) using stolen credentials.

Typically, BEC is a form of cyber attack where attackers create fake emails that impersonate executives  in order to convince employees to send money to a bank account controlled by the bad guys. According to the FBI, BEC is the costliest form of cyber attack, scamming business out of $1.7 billion in 2019 alone. One reason these attacks are becoming so successful is because attackers are upping their game: instead of creating fake email address that look like a CEO or a vendor, attackers are now learning to steal login info to make their scams that much more convincing.

By compromising credentials, BEC attackers have opened up multiple new avenues to carry out their attack and increase the change of success. Among all the ways compromised credentials can be used for BEC attacks, here are 3 that every business should know about.

Vendor Email Compromise

One way BEC attackers can use compromised credentials has been called vendor email compromise. The name, however, is a little misleading, because vendors aren’t actually the target of the attack. Instead, they are the means to carry an attack out on a business. Essentially, BEC attackers will compromise the email credentials of an employee at the billing department of a vendor, then send invoices from that email to businesses requesting they make payment to a bank account controlled by the attackers.

Vendor email compromise example

Source: Agari

Inside Jobs

Another way attackers can use compromised credentials to carry out BEC scams is to use the credentials of someone in the finance or accounting department of an organizations to make payment requests to other employees and suppliers. By using the actual email of someone within the company, payments requests look far more legitimate and increase the change that the scam will succeed.

What’s more, attackers can use compromised credentials of someone in the billing department to even target customers for payment. Of course, if the customers make a payment, it goes to the attackers and not to the company they think they are paying. This is a new method of BEC, but one that is gaining steam. In a press release earlier this year, the FBI warned of the use of compromised credentials in BEC to target customers.

Advanced Intel Gathering

Another method to use compromised credentials for BEC doesn’t even involve using the compromised account to request payments. Instead, attackers will gain access to the email account of an employee in the finance department and simply gather information. With enough time, attackers can study who the business releases funds to, how often, and what the payment requests look like. With all of this information under their belt, attackers will then create a near-perfect impersonation of the entity requesting payment and send the request exactly when the business is expecting it.

Attackers have even figured out a way to retain access to employee’s emails after they’ve been locked out of the account. Once they’ve gained access to an employee’s inbox, attackers will often set the account to auto-forward any emails the employee receives to an account controlled by the attacker. That way, if the employee changes their password, the attacker can still view every message the employee receives.

What you can do

All three of these emerging attack methods attack should make businesses realize that BEC is a real and dangerous threat. It can be far harder to detect a BEC attack when the attackers are sending emails from a real address or using insider information from compromised credentials to expertly impersonate a vendor. Attackers can gain access to these credentials in a number of ways. First, through initial phishing attacks designed to capture employee credentials. Earlier this year, for example, attackers launched a spear phishing campaign to gather the credentials of finance executives‘ Microsoft 365 accounts in order to then carry out a BEC attack. Attackers can also pay for credentials on the dark web that were stolen in past data breaches. Even though these breaches often involve credentials of employees’ personal accounts, if an employee uses the same login info for every account, then attackers will have easy access to carry out their next BEC scam.

While the use of compromised credentials can make BEC harder to detect, there are a number of things organizations can do to protect themselves. First, businesses should ensure all employees—and vendors!—are properly trained in spotting and identifying phishing attacks. Second, organizations should require proper password management is for all users. Employees should use different credentials for every account, and multi-factor authentication should be enabled for vulnerable accounts such as email. Lastly, organization should disable or limit the auto-forwarding to prevent attackers from continuing to capture emails received by a targeted employee.

Businesses should also ensure employees in the finance department receive additional BEC training. A report earlier this year found an 87% increase in BEC attacks targeting employees in finance departments. Ensuring employees in the finance department know, for example, to confirm any changes to a vendor’s bank information before releasing funds, is key to protecting your organization from falling prey to the increasingly sophisticated BEC landscape.

Building a Misinformation-Resilient Business

Building a Misinformation-Resilient Business

By now, most everyone has heard about the threat of misinformation within our political system. At this point, fake news is old news. However, this doesn’t mean the threat is any less dangerous. In fact, over the last few years misinformation has spread beyond the political world and into the private sector. From a fake news story claiming that Coca-Cola was recalling Dasani water because of a deadly parasite in the bottles, to false reports that an Xbox killed a teenager, more and more businesses are facing online misinformation about their brands, damaging the reputations and financial stability of their organizations. While businesses may not think to take misinformation attacks into account when evaluating the cyber threat landscape, it’s more and more clear misinformation should be a primary concern for organizations. Just as businesses are beginning to understand the importance of being cyber-resilient, organizations need to also have policies in place to stay misinformation-resilient. This means organization need to start taking both a proactive and a reactive stance towards future misinformation attacks.

Perhaps the method of disinformation we are all most familiar with is the use of social media to quickly spread false or sensationalized information about a person or brand. However, there are a number of different guises disinformation can take. Fraudulent domains, for example, can be used to impersonate companies in order to misrepresent brands. Attackers also create copy cat sites that look like your website, but actually contain malware that visitors download when the visit the site. Inside personnel can weaponize digital tools to settle scores or hurt the company’s reputation — the water-cooler rumor mill now can now play out in very public and spreadable online spaces. And finally, attackers can create doctored videos called deep fakes that can create convincing videos of public figures saying things on camera they never actually said. You’ve probably seen deepfakes of politicians like Barak Obama or Nancy Pelosi, but these videos can also be used to impersonate business leadership that are shared online or circulated among staff.

With all of the different ways misinformation attacks can be used against businesses, its clear organizations need to be prepared to stay resilient in the face of any misinformation that appears. Here are 5 steps all organizations should take to build and maintain a misinformation-resilient business:

1. Monitor Social Media and Domains

Employees across various departments of your organization should be constantly keeping their ear to the ground by closely monitoring for any strange or unusual activity by and about your brand. Your marketing and social media team should be regularly keeping an eye on any chatter online about the brand and evaluate the veracity of claims being made, where they originate, and how widespread is the information is being shared.

At the same time, your IT department should be continuously looking for new domains that mention or closely resemble your brand. It’s common for scammers to create domains that impersonate brands in order to spread false information, phish for private information, or just seed confusion. The frequency of domain spoofing has sky-rocketed this year, as bad actors take advantage of the panic and confusion surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic. When it comes to spotting deepfakes, your IT team should invest in software that can detect whether images and recordings have been altered

Across all departments, your organization needs to keep an eye out for any potential misinformation attacks. Departments also need to be in regular communication with each other and with business leadership to evaluate the scope and severity of threats as soon as they appear.

2. Know When You Are Most Vulnerable

Often, scammers behind misinformation attacks are opportunists. They look for big news stories, moments of transition, or when investors will be keep a close eye on an organization in order to create attacks with the biggest impact. Broadcom’s shares plummeted after a fake memorandum from the US Department of Defense claimed an acquisition the company was about to make posed a threat to national security. Organization’s need to stay vigilant for moments that scammer can take advantage of, and prepare a response to any potential attack that could arise.

3. Create and Test a Response Plan

We’ve talked a lot about the importance of having a cybersecurity incident response plan, and the same rule is true for responding to misinformation. Just as with a cybersecurity attack, you shouldn’t wait to figure out a response until after attack has happened. Instead, organizations need to form a team from various levels within the company and create a detailed plan of how to respond to a misinformation campaign before it actually happens. Teams should know what resources will be needed to respond, who internally and externally needs to be notified of the incident, and which team members will respond to which aspect of the incident.

It’s also important to not just create a plan, but to test it as well. Running periodic simulations of a disinformation attack will not only help your team practice their response, but can also show you what areas of the response aren’t working, what wasn’t considered in the initial plan, and what needs to change to make sure your organization’s response runs like clock work when a real attack hits. Depending on the organization, it may make sense to include disinformation attacks within the cybersecurity response plan or to create a new plan and team specifically for disinformation.

4. Train Your Employees

Employees throughout the organizations should also be trained to understand the risks disinformation can pose to the business, and how to effectively spot and report any instances they may come across. Employees need to learn how to question images and videos they see, just as they should be wary links in an email They should be trained on how to quickly respond internally to disinformation originated from other insiders like disgruntled employees, and key personnel need to be trained on how to quickly respond to disinformation in the broader digital space.

5. Act Fast

Putting all of the above steps in place will enable organizations to take swift action again disinformation campaigns. Fake news spreads fast, so an organizations need to act just as quickly. From putting your response plan in motion, to communicating with your social media follow and stake-holders, to contacting social media platforms to have the disinformation content removed all need to happen quickly for your organization to stay ahead of the attack.

 

It may make sense to think of cybersecurity and misinformation as two completely separate issues, but more and more businesses are finding out that the two are closely intertwined. Phishing attacks rely on disinformation tactics, and fake news uses technical sophistications to make their content more convincing and harder to detect. In order to stay resilient to misinformation, businesses need to incorporate these issues into larger conversations about cybersecurity across all levels and departments of the organization. Preparing now and having a response plan in place can make all the difference in maintaining your business’s reputation when false information about your brand starts making the rounds online.

Experts Worry Future AI Crimes Will Target Human Vulnerabilities

Experts Worry Future AI Crimes Will Target Human Vulnerabilities

Earlier this month, a study by the University College London identified the top 20 security issues and crimes likely to be carried out with the use of artificial intelligence in the near future. Experts then ranked the list of future AI crimes by the potential risk associated with each crime. While some of the crimes are what you might expect to see in a movie — such as autonomous drone attacks or using driverless cars as a weapon — it turns out 4 out of the 6 crimes that are of highest concern are less glamorous, and instead focused on exploiting human vulnerabilities and bias’.

Here are the top 4 human-factored AI threats:

Deepfakes

The ability for AI to fabricate visual and audio evidence, commonly called deepfakes, is the overall most concerning threat. The study warns that the use of deepfakes will “exploit people’s implicit trust in these media.” The concern is not only related to the use of AI to impersonate public figures, but also the ability to use deepfakes to trick individuals into transferring funds or handing over access to secure systems or sensitive information.

Scalable Spear-Phishing

Other high-risk, human-factored AI threats include scalable spear-phishing attacks. At the moment, phishing emails targeting specific individuals requires time and energy to learn the victims interests and habits. However, AI can expedite this process by rapidly pulling information from social media or impersonating trusted third parties. AI can therefore make spear-phishing more likely to succeed and far easier to deploy on a mass scale.

Mass Blackmail

Similarly, the study warns that AI can be used to harvest a mass information about individuals, identify those most vulnerable to blackmail, then send tailor-crafted threats to each victim. These large-scale blackmail schemes can also use deepfake technology to create fake evidence against those being blackmailed.

Disinformation

Lastly, the study highlights the risk of using AI to author highly convincing disinformation and fake news. Experts warn that AI will be able to learn what type of content will have the highest impact, and generate different versions of one article to be publish by variety of (fake) sources. This tactic can help disinformation spread even faster and make the it seem more believable. Disinformation has already been used to manipulate political events such as elections, and experts fear the scale and believability of AI-generated fake news will only increase the impact disinformation will have in the future.

The results of the study underscore the need to develop systems to identify AI-generated images and communications. However, that might not be enough. According to the study, when it comes to spotting deepfakes, “[c]hanges in citizen behaviour might [ ] be the only effective defence.” With the majority of the highest risk crimes being human-factored threats, focusing on our own ability to understand ourselves and developing behaviors that give us the space to reflect before we react may therefore become to most important tool we have against these threats.