Cyber Awareness 4 mins at a time

Last week we announced our new Behavior-Designed Cyber Awareness ProgramOne part of that program will be a structured phish simulation campaigns; another part of the program is series of courses on a broad range of topics related to digital awareness, appropriate security practices, and behavioral biases which impact susceptibility to phishing emails and other forms of social engineering. Each course contains a number of micro-lessons designed to take only a few minutes — typically around 4 minutes — to complete. The intent of each course, in addition to the phish simulations that will run concurrently, is to give participants the tools they need to recognize and modify their online behavior in order to maintain a safer and healthier digital presence.  

Soon we will be rolling out the entire program, but for now we want to offer a sneak peak of what’s to come. Right now we are offering a free preview of a course on phishing attacks and how to spot them. If you want to try it out click here and enroll now for free 

And, if you haven’t already, you can check out a review of our new program published as a part of the Stanford Peace Tech Lab. 

Behavior-Designed Cyber Awareness — A New Program

For the Past Year, Designed Privacy has been working to integrate behavior design into the cyber awareness process. Through a series of testing, we have created a CyberAwareness Program which we are launching this Fall.  The Program not only shows strong results in reducing phish susceptibility, the behaviors it’s designed to create show the potential to both mitigate digital disinformation efforts and get people to collaborate on reinforcing secure behaviors, whether in the office, at home or with clients and vendors.

In addition, we are extremely pleased to have process and results published by the Peace Innovation Lab at Stanford.

After a year of testing three things are clear:
1). Cyber awareness without behavior change is a waste of time, money and energy;
2). Behavior changes occurs through a combination of ease, prompting and positive reinforcement. People are more apt to change behaviors when they see a positive WIIFM.
3). Behavior-designed cyber awareness not only leads to reduced phish susceptibility, but it also has the potential to lead to better organizational decision making, especially as we are relying more and more on digital information to make those decisions.

In a world of phishing, online scams,  deepfake video and content, and the weaponization of social media, we all need to develop behaviors to help us determine what is real and what is not if we want to be secure, make sound decisions and feel that we still have the space where our choices are our own.

Please read the Stanford Peace Innovation Lab article here.